Archive for the ‘medvedev’ Tag

Vladimir Putin Elected President of Russia   Leave a comment

ImageVladimir Putin was elected President of Russia in the May 4, 2012 election.

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A. A. Deyneka Exhibit In Rome Inaugurates 2011 As Year Of Italian And Russian Culture   Leave a comment

An exhibition of paintings by Soviet artist Aleksander Aleksandrovich Deyneka (1899-1969) opened in Rome on Thursday, inaugurating a year packed with hundreds of joint cultural events between Italy and Russia.

The paintings on loan from Russia depict famous scenes from the Russian Revolution and World War II, but also nudes and images of daily life in the Soviet Union with factory workers, sportsmen and children.

Deyneka came from a family of railroad workers and started out as a police photographer after graduating from art school. He made mosaics in the 1930s for Mayakovskaya metro station in central Moscow.

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev visited Italy this week and said the 12 months ahead would see some 500 events organised by the two countries including exhibitions, concerts, film showings and plays.

The Deyneka ehibit runs in Rome’s Palazzo delle Esposizioni until May 1.

Russia to Boost Oil Exports to China   Leave a comment

Prime Minister Vladimir Putin opened the Russian section of an oil pipeline that will boost oil exports to China from East Siberia.

“This is an important project because we are beginning to diversify the delivery of our energy resources,” Putin said at today’s opening of the pipeline in Skovorodino in Russia’s Far Eastern Amur region, in comments posted on his official website. “Thus far, shipments were made to our European partners.”

Putin said Russia is currently pumping 120 million to 130 million tons of oil to Europe and only “a small amount to Asia Pacific,” according to comments on his site.

“The China-Pacific pipeline is the most important energy project in Russia since the opening of the gas pipeline to Europe,” said Chris Weafer, chief strategist at UralSib Financial Corp., in e-mailed comments today. “It means that Russia’s strategic importance to China has increased considerably.”

Construction of the 64-kilometer (40-mile) pipeline on the Russian side was launched by OAO Transneft, the oil pipeline monopoly, in April 2009, according to Vesti-24 television. From the border, the pipeline will run a further 960 kilometers to the Chinese town of Daqing, located in the country’s northeast. China will begin testing after completion of its section of the pipeline in late September, Vesti added.

Igor Sechin, Putin’s deputy for energy, said Russia would also open 500 gas stations across China, Vesti added.

May 9, 2010: Victory Day   Leave a comment

May 9th is Victory Day (Den Pobedy/День Победы). RADA sends its very best wishes to all who have served.

Russia and Ukraine Agree on Natural Gas and Port of Sevastopol   Leave a comment

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych announced an agreement ending years of animosity between the two former Soviet republics at the end of a one-day summit in the eastern Ukrainian border city of Kharkiv.

Russia agreed to a 30 percent drop in the price of natural gas sold to Ukraine, in exchange for permission to extend Russia’s lease of a major naval base in the Black Sea port of Sevastopol, Ukraine, for 25 years.

The agreement may bring an end to years of disputes over natural gas prices, which culminated in Russia turning off the pipeline to Ukraine.

Ukraine and Russia had been at odds ever since the “Orange Revolution” swept Yanukovych’s anti-Russian predecessor Viktor Yushchenko to power in 2005.

Throughout his time in office, Yushchenko repeatedly threatened to expel Russia’s Black Sea Fleet from Sevastopol. The Russian military lease there was scheduled to expire in 2017.

The Kremlin-friendly Yanukovych, who hails from predominantly Russian-speaking eastern Ukraine, trounced Yushchenko in national elections in January.

The Russian president said the new deal added a “concrete and pragmatic dimension,” to centuries of relations between Ukrainians and Russians.

Georgian TV “Simulation” Creates “War of the Worlds” Panic in the Caucasus   Leave a comment

MARCH 14, 2010: A television station in Georgia triggered a panic when it broadcast a mock half-hour report about a Russian invasion of the country.

Emotions are still raw in many parts of Georgia after Russian tanks, troops and armored vehicles advanced into the former Soviet Republic in August 2008.

That invasion was triggered after Georgian troops attacked pro-Russian separatists in the breakaway republic of South Ossetia. In the fighting that ensued, each side offered conflicting figures on how many people died.

On the evening of March 13, 2010, pro-government Imedi TV in Georgia broadcast what it called a “simulation” of what a fresh invasion would look like. The broadcast ended with a note that the events in it were not real.

The show did not run any on-screen notes during the half-hour broadcast to alert viewers that what they were watching was not real.

Viewers were alarmed.

The show used archived sound bites from Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, as well as footage of Georgians fleeing the 2008 conflict.

Throughout the show, the anchor provided “updates” that Russian forces had bombed the airport in the Georgian capital, Tbilisi, and a military base in the country.

It reported that four Georgians had been killed and six wounded near South Ossetia.

About two hours later, the station began scrolling a text, apologizing for spreading panic among viewers.

Manana Manjgaladze, the spokeswoman for Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, also made an unexpected live appearance at Imedi’s studio to apologize to viewers for the false alarm.

Patriarch Ilia II, the leader of the Georgian Orthodox Church, condemned the fake report.

“This kind of experiment is a crime to our people and to humanity,” he said in a sermon before thousands of worshippers at Sunday Mass in Tbilisi’s Holy Trinity Cathedral.

Yanukovich Inaugurated as Ukrainian President   Leave a comment

KIEV, UKRAINE: 25.FEB.2010: Viktor Yanukovich vowed to steer Ukraine on a course between Russia and the west as he was sworn in as Ukraine’s president today.

”Ukraine will choose such a foreign policy that will allow the state to get the maximum results from the development of equal and mutually advantageous relations with Russia, the European Union, the US and other governments,” he said at his inauguration ceremony in the country’s parliament.

He went on to describe his vision of Ukraine as a “neutral European state”.

Relations with Moscow soured under his predecessor Viktor Yushchenko, who pushed for Kiev to join Nato. To the satisfaction of Moscow, which strongly opposes Nato’s eastward expansion, Mr. Yanukovich has pledged to keep Ukraine out of any military bloc.

Despite a controversial background, which includes two stints in jail for petty crimes during his youth, Mr. Yanukovich’s victory, in an election dubbed largely democratic, has been well received by both Russia and the west. His inauguration was attended by senior officials from Brussels, Russia and former Soviet republics.

Mr. Yanukovich’s political career seemed doomed after he lost the 2004 presidential contest as the Moscow-backed candidate. This time round he capitalized on bitter rivalries between the Orange Revolution leaders and narrowly beat Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko in a February 7 run-off vote.

Despite winning the presidency, Mr Yanukovich has yet to consolidate enough political power in Kiev to push through his agenda.  In the near term, he will seek to remove Tymoshenko from her post as as prime minister, a position that holds more authority over domestic affairs than the presidency.

The most controversial of Mr. Yanukovich’s alleged plans include prolonging the stay of Russia’s Black Sea fleet at a Ukrainian port. Another controversial plan could give Russia, Europe and Ukrainian businessmen loyal to him a management stake in Ukraine’s strategic natural gas pipeline via a consortium. Granting Russian official state language status would be welcome in the heartland of his support in eastern Ukraine, but it would alienate western Ukraine, which speaks Ukrainian.