Archive for the ‘georgia’ Tag

2013: The Year of the Snake   Leave a comment

year-of-the-snake

RADA conducts due diligence and business intelligence investigations in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, Romania, Moldova, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.

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Georgian TV “Simulation” Creates “War of the Worlds” Panic in the Caucasus   Leave a comment

MARCH 14, 2010: A television station in Georgia triggered a panic when it broadcast a mock half-hour report about a Russian invasion of the country.

Emotions are still raw in many parts of Georgia after Russian tanks, troops and armored vehicles advanced into the former Soviet Republic in August 2008.

That invasion was triggered after Georgian troops attacked pro-Russian separatists in the breakaway republic of South Ossetia. In the fighting that ensued, each side offered conflicting figures on how many people died.

On the evening of March 13, 2010, pro-government Imedi TV in Georgia broadcast what it called a “simulation” of what a fresh invasion would look like. The broadcast ended with a note that the events in it were not real.

The show did not run any on-screen notes during the half-hour broadcast to alert viewers that what they were watching was not real.

Viewers were alarmed.

The show used archived sound bites from Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, as well as footage of Georgians fleeing the 2008 conflict.

Throughout the show, the anchor provided “updates” that Russian forces had bombed the airport in the Georgian capital, Tbilisi, and a military base in the country.

It reported that four Georgians had been killed and six wounded near South Ossetia.

About two hours later, the station began scrolling a text, apologizing for spreading panic among viewers.

Manana Manjgaladze, the spokeswoman for Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, also made an unexpected live appearance at Imedi’s studio to apologize to viewers for the false alarm.

Patriarch Ilia II, the leader of the Georgian Orthodox Church, condemned the fake report.

“This kind of experiment is a crime to our people and to humanity,” he said in a sermon before thousands of worshippers at Sunday Mass in Tbilisi’s Holy Trinity Cathedral.

South Ossetia: One Year Anniversary   Leave a comment

ossetian_flag04.August.2009

Russian troops in South Ossetia have been put on increased combat readiness amid rising tensions on the de facto border with Georgia, officials said today.

Andrey Nesterenko, the spokesman for Russia’s Foreign Ministry, said the move was meant to prevent more violence.

The situation near South Ossetia has become increasingly tense as the first anniversary of the Russian-Georgian war approaches Friday.

U.S. President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev discussed the “lessons of last year’s Georgian crisis” in a telephone conversation late Tuesday, the Kremlin said in a statement. There was no elaboration.

After the war, Russia recognized South Ossetia and Abkhazia, another separatist region in Georgia, as independent nations and permanently deployed thousands of troops there.

Russia Withdraws From NATO Meeting, Others Follow   Leave a comment

lavrov1Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov has withdrawn NATO-Russia Council meeting planned for Brussels this month to protest the alliance’s upcoming military exercises in Georgia and the expulsion of two Russian diplomats from its headquarters.

Lavrov’s decision to withdraw from the May 19 meeting was based on concerns about the exercises that start Wednesday and over the expulsions last week, which were in apparent retaliation for a spy case dating back to February.

Russia is frustrated by what it sees as Western meddling in its traditional sphere of influence and opposes Georgia’s efforts to join NATO. NATO maintains the war games in Georgia, which fought a short war with Russia last August, are not directed at Russia.

The NATO exercises, which continue through June 1, were initially to include about 1,300 personnel from 19 NATO and partner nations.

Some former Soviet republics have decided not to participate.

Among the countries to back out was Armenia, which is dependent on Russia for its economic survival. Four other former Soviet republics — Estonia, Latvia, Kazakhstan and Moldova — and Serbia have also pulled out.

Russian: Maybe Difficult, Definitely Useful!   Leave a comment

russian_01Russian is the official language of the Russian Federation. In addition, it also one of the official languages of Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan. It is also spoken widely in Ukraine, and to varying extents in many of the former Soviet republics, particularly Moldova, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan.

Russian has the reputation of being a “difficult” language. What this really means is that it is quite different from English in many ways, some quite significant. A good knowledge of Russian will help in learning any other Slavic language, such as Czech or Polish, and the similarlties between the Slavic languages can make it possible to at least read certain things. Anyone knowing Russian, for example, will have no problem at all in knowing that the Czech sign “VYCHOD” is the exit!

A knowledge of Russian is essnential for conducting due diligence. The Moscow Metro has very nice signage, but it is all in Russian! Even though many professionals speak some English, most business and socializing is conducted in Russian, and this goes well beyond Moscow, into the majority of the former Soviet Republics.

Due Diligence and Business Intelligence   Leave a comment

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